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Action Alert:  Oppose Mining at Mt. St. Helens

To learn about the Goat Mountain area that would be affected by Ascot Resources’ proposed mine, watch this video:

Because of current mining laws, once a company can show a mine’s economic viability, it is very difficult to stop a mine on federal land. NOW is the time for you to act.

Go to this link https://cascadeforest.org/get-involved/action-item-2/ and sign the petition against the mine.  

To learn more about the work of Cascade Forest Conservancy, the sponsor of this petition, go to https://cascadeforest.org/our-work/mining/

Approval of this mining project would set terrible precedents. The mining lease area borders a national monument, and the land was bought with Land and Conservation Fund dollars for outdoor recreation and conservation.

Read more: Action Alert:  Oppose Mining at Mt. St. Helens

Dep. of Natural Resources Denies Lease for Millennium’s Coal Export Terminal in Longview

On January 3, 2017, Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Peter Goldmark denied Millennium Bulk Terminal’s Ltd.’s for lease of public aquatic land that would be part of the proposed coal export terminal in Longview, Washington. It is highly unlikely that Millennium can proceed without this permit. 

This is a victory for the Tribes, Washington’s Audubon chapters, other environmental organizations, and thousands of people who staunchly opposed this project for six years. Thank you to all who wrote comments, signed petitions, rallied, marched, wrote letters, gave public testimony, and lobbied our elected representatives. Your voices were heard.

At the same time, Commissioner Goldmark expanded Puget Sound’s Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve north of Bellingham, adding 45 acres previously considered for a large coal export terminal.

For more, see newspaper accounts or go to http://www.dnr.wa.gov/news/dnr-expands-puget-sound-columbia-river-protection

 

Precipitous Decline of Marbled Murrelet in Washington – How You Can Help

The Marbled Murrelet is a robin-sized bird that was listed as threatened in 1992 under the Endangered Species Act. This bird spends most of its life on near-shore waters from northern California to Alaska. It flies inland to breed high in the canopy of old-growth forest within sixty miles of shore.

The NW Forest Plan was created in 1993 to protect breeding habitat for Marbled Murrelet and Northern Spotted Owl. Without this plan there would now be no old-growth forest on state or federal lands; however, private landowners can cut any timber.

This August shocking news was published on the status of Marbled Murrelet after 20 years of the NW Forest Plan. The science report said:

  • In Washington State the Plan has not been successful--the population of Marbled Murrelet has declined 48% since 2001.
  • This decline in numbers is tied to decline in breeding habitat, mostly due to timber harvest of habitat on nonfederal lands. Marine conditions were not an important factor.
  • The decrease in both habitat and numbers is the largest in SW Washington, where there is little federal forested land. To read the full report, go to “MAMU GTR” at the bottom of http://www.reo.gov/monitoring/reports/20yr-report/

At current rates of decline there will be no Marbled Murrelet in SW Washington within 15 years!   If the SW Washington population disappears, the northern population of birds in Washington, Canada and Alaska will be genetically isolated from the southern population in Oregon and California. This genetic bottleneck could quickly lead to species extinction. The situation for Marbled Murrelets is critical.

BUT YOU CAN HELP THIS OCTOBER! To find out how, click the read more below.

Read more: Precipitous Decline of Marbled Murrelet in Washington – How You Can Help

Columbia Riverkeeper's new Handford video

This August marks the 70th anniversary of the devastating bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, during World War II. Hanford produced the plutonium for “Fat Man,” the nuclear bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan. Watch Columbia Riverkeeper's newest short film, Hanford: A Race Against Time” showing how Hanford’s nuclear legacy poses an ever-present threat to the Columbia River and river communities.

Columbia Riverkeepers are also collecting signatures for a petition to President Obama about Hanford cleanup. Go here for more information.

Bald Eagle Recovery

More bald eagles spend the winter in Oregon than anywhere in the U.S. outside Alaska. Yet the lower Columbia River is one area in Oregon where eagles have trouble successfully hatching eggs.

Watch a recent Bald Eagle episode of OPB's Oregon Field Guide.

Jul
29

Sat 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

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